Tuesday, January 1, 2008

A New New Year's Tradition

A New Year's tradition is born.

The New Year has begun! We greeted the New Year with champagne, fireworks, and noisemakers at Jeff and Mary's house, after a memorable evening of good food, good drinks, and a Trivial Pursuit game that went right down to the wire. My team, which included the son of my valued fellow blogger Jim H., was graceful in defeat. The evening also included the debut of the new deep-fat fryer, which was used to make delicious onion rings and, best of all, Scotch eggs. Scotch eggs are a traditional staple of British picnic baskets, invented by the venerable firm of Fortum and Mason and now widely available in cheap versions as a quick, cholesterol-intensive, artery-hardening snack. My introduction to the Scotch egg was on a Kenilworth market day in May, when I bought one from the Cotswold Pudding and Pie Company. Hard-boiled egg, encased in sausage, dipped in egg, rolled in bread crumbs, and deep fried. Delicious. In Clara's brother Frank's house, the New Year's Eve tradition is raclette, melted to perfection in front of an open fire. Last night, Jeff and I started a new New Year's Eve tradition: Scotch eggs.

A Scotch egg cooking in the new deep fat fryer.

A Scotch egg, halved.

3 comments:

kookiejar said...

Happy New Year. The scotch eggs look amazing. I lost at SuperScrabble, so don't feel bad. :)

fabrile heart said...

Doh!

As I am on a bit of a Tom Lehrer bent at the moment I will cadge another one of his lines. As he said about smut, "he's all for it"

Well, I'm all for starting new traditions, hooray for the Scotch egg :)

Jim H. said...

My son is gracious in defeat? Gotta have a talk with that boy...

When he described Scotch eggs to us on New Years Day, we thought he might be exaggerating. Egg AND sausage AND fat AND more egg? But your essay makes them sound appetizing. Sort of.

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