Saturday, November 18, 2017

Public Poetry at the Northfield Public Library

In early August, the director of the Northfield Public Library, Teresa Jensen, asked me to write a poem to be displayed prominently in the atrium of the Northfield Public Library. She wanted something that would capture the essence of the library as a place of knowledge and stories, a community gathering place, and a democratic institution. I wrote a poem in five stanzas of four lines each. The first four stanzas consist of three lines in English and a concluding line in Spanish. The final stanza translates each of the Spanish lines into English.

On Friday, November 17, 2017, the poem was installed at the public library. The plastic films were designed, created, and installed by Graphic Mailbox in Northfield. Here's the Northfield Public Library's Facebook post unveiling the new poem:




Friday, November 3, 2017

New Publication: Commentary on Selections from Bede's Historia Ecclesiastica

In 2014, I started work on a commentary on Selections from Bede's Historia Ecclesiastica for the Dickinson College Commentaries series. Three years later, the commentary has gone live on the DCC website. The commentary, with grammatical and historical notes, vocabulary lists, and accompanying maps, images, and essays, is accessible for free by anyone who wants to read Bede's wonderful Latin and learn about Anglo-Saxon Christianity. The commentary would not have been possible without the contributions of Austin Mason (Carleton College) and Christopher Francese (Dickinson College). Other contributors include: Bret Mulligan (Haverford College), Sasha Mayn (Carleton College ’18), Bard Swallow (Carleton College ’18), Martha Durrett (Carleton College ’18), William North (Carleton College), and the participants in the 2016 Dickinson College Latin Workshop.

Thursday, August 31, 2017

Two New Online Publications

Two of my very brief essays were published online this summer. The first was the essay "Telephone," which appeared in June in the online version of The Common, in the journal's "Dispatches" section. The second, "Metaphor Lesson," appeared in August in the online version of River Teeth Journal, in the journal's "Beautiful Things" section. 

Friday, July 7, 2017

Now Available: Aeschylus, Oresteia: An Adaptation

Now available from Hero Now Theatre: Aeschylus, Oresteia: An Adaptation by Rob Hardy. Paperback. 72pp. $16.95

In his adaptation of Aeschylus's classic drama, first performed at Carleton College’s Weitz Center Theater in May 2012, Rob Hardy delivers the essence of this famous trilogy in a single play that speaks forcefully to today’s audiences. 

In lean, lyrical poetry, Hardy’s Aeschylus highlights all the glory of the original, including epic tales of lust, war, family strife, and revenge; choruses that echo the religious influences behind Greek drama; and Aeschylus's pride in Athenian law, philosophy, and oratory. 

In his Oresteia Aeschylus gave Athenians reason to believe that institutionalized justice, not revenge, would tame the savagery of human beings. His message resonates in our time, and Hardy’s accessible adaptation is a steadfast modern guide to this ancient wisdom. 

“A heady bouquet of new wine drawn from an old wineskin.” 
—Eric Dugdale (Gustavus Adolphus College), reviewing the 2012 Carleton College production in Didaskalia: The Journal for Ancient Performance 

The book comes with an introduction by Professor of Classics (Emeritus) Thomas Van Nortwick, of Oberlin College, describing the political, social, and aesthetic context of the trilogy, and offering high praise for Hardy’s adept, graceful adaptation. Hardy has added numerous explanatory notes to help the non-specialist with unfamiliar names and concepts, and a map shows the location of important place-names mentioned in the play.

Monday, February 27, 2017

Now Available: Domestication: Collected Poems 1996-2016.


Domestication: Collected Poems 1996-2016. Published February 25, 2017. 

Available now from Shipwreckt Books in Rushford, Minnesota, and from Content Bookstore in Northfield, Minnesota. Also available on Amazon.

"Rob Hardy brings together the wide range of gifts that place him among the few whose common touch makes them exceptional. In work that is at once accessible, enjoyable, and wonderfully well-made Hardy shows, without pretentious display, that poetry is not an outsider’s cryptic game. His poems demonstrate what Henry David Thoreau teaches: that profundity may best be found in simplicity. Hardy gracefully combines his deep knowledge of the ancient classics and his wide interest in scientific learning with his first-hand experience of nature and human relationships." —Emilio DeGrazia



Tuesday, February 21, 2017

New Publication: An Essay on Phyllis Bottome (Critical Flame)

Phyllis Bottome was a British novelist, well-known during her lifetime, who observed the rise of Hitler first-hand during the years she lived in Munich in the early 1930s. In essays and in her novel The Mortal Storm, Bottome about the grave threat of European fascism, and of Hitler in general, at a time when the general mood was one of appeasement. My essay in The Critical Flame focuses on her novel The Mortal Storm (1938), and draws some connections with current events in the United States. 

Monday, January 16, 2017

New Publication: An Essay on Susan Glaspell (Ploughshares)

The current (Winter 2016-2017) issue of Ploughshares includes my essay "'We Live Close Together and We Live far Apart: A Look2 Essay on Susan Glaspell." Susan Glaspell was born in Davenport, Iowa, in 1876. With her husband, she founded the Provincetown Players, the pioneering experimental theater that launched the career of Eugene O'Neill. Her own plays for the Provincetown Players, including the classic Trifles, established her as one of the leading playwright of her day, and one of the founders of modern American theater. In 1931, she became only the second woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for drama. She's less well-known as a novelist. Fidelity (1915) and Brook Evans (1928), reissued by Persephone Books in London, are the only two of her nine novels currently in print. Ploughshares' "Look2" series features essay about neglected authors like Glaspell who deserve a second look. 

Public Poetry at the Northfield Public Library

In early August, the director of the Northfield Public Library, Teresa Jensen, asked me to write a poem to be displayed prominently in the...